Tag Archives: España

Roast Pumpkin Salad with Romesco Vinaigrette #BarGitano

romesco vinaigrette

A couple of weeks ago, I was invited to taste Bar Gitano’s rejuvenated menu.  Chef Carlos Vázquez has added delicious small plates to the tasca’s already popular dishes – and inspired a salad recipe that would be right at home with them.

Some of Bar Gitano’s new menu items developed by Chef Vázquez include:

  • Veal and pork meatballs braised in sherry with tomatoes, shallots and migas
  • Arugula salad w roasted beets, fried goat cheese nuggets and pistachio and fig jam vinaigrette
  • Brandada de Bacalao: Codfish croquettes with lime aioli
  • Goat cheese pizzeta with romesco, fig jam, truffle oil & arugula
  • Lamb skewers with mint salsa verde and fennel salad
  • Mussels with chorizo in a rich pimenton-wine broth & toasted bread
  • Medjool dates stuffed with Valdeón cheese wrapped in bacon
  • Coconut Cake Gitano with guava mousse and topped with  toasted meringue

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French Fridays with Dorie: Sangria Chicken

sangria chicken

The best kind of challenge

Every so often, a French Fridays with Dorie recipe pops up that makes you wish you had access to great ingredients. This week’s recipe, Seared Duck Breasts with Kumquats, is one of those. Duck breasts?  Not on my radar unless I call “my” friendly restaurant supplier.  Kumquats?  If my fellow Doristas couldn’t find them state/Canada-side, you can imagine there’s little hope for this island girl.  Not that it bothered me.  Au contraire, it was time to improvise and have fun with this challenge.

What do we always have on hand?  Boneless, skinless chicken thighs.  The dark chicken meat will never be an apples to apples substitute for gamey duck breasts, but it is as close as it gets.  Orange zest syrup replaces the not-yet-in season kumquats.  A bottle of $4 merlot fills the fruity wine quota.  If the recipe from Around My French Table is your woo-food, dinner date at home recipe, this is the weekday version for whenever the cravings hit for citrus and wine sauce.  This is no impostor fragrance version of the recipe.  It’s good on its own merits. Read More…

Whole Wheat Rolls for Montaditos

Whole Wheat Rolls for Montaditos

One of my in-laws favorite spots to out and enjoy a fun meal in Miami is 100 Montaditos.  100 Montaditos is a chain hailing from Spain that sells small, inexpensive and tasty sandwiches filled with pretty much any combination of meat, cheeses, veggies and even tortilla española.  Their Wednesday specials are notorious – all sandwiches are priced at a dollar, and cañas  (small draft beers) sell for two.   The montaditos main draw is the tiny, crusty baguette they are served in.  These sandwiches can be finished in a couple of bites, allowing you to taste many different combinations in one sitting.  Their menu literally contains a hundred options. Read More…

French Fridays with Dorie: Tuna Packed Piquillo Peppers

Tuna Packed Piquillo Peppers

Tuna fish sandwiches are the ultimate resuelve (literally, problem solver) meal.  Tuna-packed piquillo peppers have turned now into the ultimate resuelve lunch, snack, appetizer.  Pantry friendly ingredients? Check.  Sweet, salty, briny flavors?  Yes please!  A quickly assembled tuna salad with shallots, capers, olives and herbs is the perfect contrast to the sweet little peppers.  Move over, jalapeño poppers!
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Boquerones (Marinated smelt)

Boquerones Marinated Smelt

My first trip to Spain was in 2005.   My family, including then-boyfriend E, traveled across el charco (the pond) to take a cruise around the Mediterranean.  We spent the days leading to and after the cruise in Barcelona and Madrid.  My sister had already lived in Spain for a summer, so she was well versed in the art of enjoying cañas (small draft beers) and tapas.  I tasted my first boquerones in vinegar marinated white anchovies, in Barcelona  under her tutelage.  Did she create a monster!  As soon as we made it back to the ship from the shore excursions, Eduardo and I would make a beeline to the tapas buffet and load up our plates with tasty marinated vegetables and ridiculous amounts of boquerones.  When we visit the Spanish/Cuban panaderías in the island, we sometimes order some.  They are definitely a treat: an order usually costs at least $1.00 per little fish.  I know now why! Read More…

Creamy Caldo Gallego

Happy New Year!

Creamy Caldo Gallego

Many people around the world are nursing hangovers this morning with some tried and true “remedy foods” – greasy spoon burgers and fries, cool citrusy ceviche, or fruit loaded smoothies.  If you happen to be in Puerto Rico and drop by a Spanish bakery in the morning, chances are you will find a few dehydrated  faces recovering with a steamy bowl of caldo gallego – Galician broth – in front of them.  Caldo gallego is a rustic soup built on a ham hock broth, with large chunks of potato and turnips, white beans, chard (acelga), and bits of ham and chorizo.   This creamy caldo gallego has all the same ingredients and proportions as the traditional version – you could leave it chunky and it would be just as good.  I pureed it because I wanted to create a contrast with fun garnishes: dehydrated chard and crisped chorizo and ham. Read More…

French Fridays with Dorie: Mussels and Chorizo

Mussels with Chorizo Without Pasta

Happy belated Valentine’s Day!  Predictably enough, I saved this week’s French Fridays with Dorie selection, Mussels and Chorizo, to celebrate the manufactured holiday and a successful presentation at the office.   Other than the tedious process of sorting, rinsing, and debearding five pounds of mussels, this was an easy, tasty meal.  We love our bivalves with pork and tomato during this time of the year! Read More…

French Weekends with Dorie: Potato Chip Tortilla

Potato  Chip Tortilla

I had been looking forward for last Friday’s recipe for some time now.  A Spanish tortilla without the hassle of parboiling potatoes?  A chance to play up with flavored potato chips?  Two Sundays ago I prepared the Potato Chip Tortilla, using onion and garlic flavored potato chips. Read More…

Eduardo’s Paella

I can count with one hand the times I’ve lit the charcoal grill by myself. The outdoor kitchen – er, grill and a small adjacent table – are definitely my husband’s realm. It was his idea to buy a paella pan to use outside, and after a practice run (and a bit of coaching from the neighbors last Sunday), the man can make a mean paella. I love his grilling face – he not only looks physically hot and sweaty from working, his brown furrows in concentration, his eyes narrow for a few seconds, but then he breaks into a smile. “Yeah… this looks good”.  So do you, babe. Read More…

Garlic-Sherry Mushrooms

 

Garlic-Sherry Mushrooms

Tapas are deceptively simple.  I have two cookbooks about tapas and almost all recipes are made with five ingredients or less.  I guess that’s why restaurants feature so many of them in their menus.  I bought everything to make these mushrooms for the paella/tapas gathering, but since we already had more than enough food I decided to save this recipe for a mid-week snack.  With only three ‘real’ ingredients (all in the name!), it’s very easy to pull off in a moment’s notice.   Read More…

Spanish Tapas and a Blog Anniversary Giveaway

“Oh, you are doing a blog… like in that Julie/Julia movie?”

“No, not exactly… but yeah, sort of.”


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Dolores/Lolita Gazpacho

My MIL is always in the lookout for great, reasonably priced restaurants both locally and in her frequent trips to Florida. One of her favorites is Dolores But You Can Call Me Lolita, a Spanish restaurant in Miami’s Brickell area. The restaurant/lounge has a huge selection of wine bottles under $20.00, appetizer-entree combos starting starting at under $20.00, and a weekday wine and tapas happy hour that my in-laws seldom miss while they are in town. As a courtesy to their patrons, they distribute their recipe for gazpacho, the traditional Spanish vegetable and bread cold soup. Read More…

Saffron and Seafood Risotto

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I struggled to name this dish.  When I made it, I thought of calling it “Paella Risotto” – it combines the flavors associated to paellas with Arborio rice in the foolproof risotto cooking technique.  Shushing my (not so inner) etymology nerd, I decided against it because paella refers to the actual pan where the rice is cooked and the dish is traditionally referred to as ‘arroz a la paella’.  After listening to Annie Siboney, the hostess of Cooking Channel’s “From Spain with Love”, say that authentic paella does not have chorizo I opted for the alliteration filled saffron and seafood risotto.  As some British dude wrote once: “What’s in a name…”  I will be working on a “real” paella soon, though.  DH ordered our first pan to use it on top of our charcoal grill after considering it for a few weeks.

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