FFwD Epilogue: Around My Franco Rican Table

Four years and three months ago – I was blogging using Posterous, a platform that doesn’t exist anymore.  Foodbuzz was the place for sharing pictures of food and loading up blog posts.  And every Friday, French Fridays with Dorie posts took over their feed.  My curiosity got the best of me and in a matter of a few clicks I secured a copy of Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table.  My Dorista journey began with pancetta green beans on February of 2011.  While it doesn’t wrap up today for me (too many recipes to make up for), today we bid farewell to this weekly ritual. 

Cooking through Around My French Table has taken me many places.  I’ve been to all corners of France through Dorie’s recipe collection: from Paris to Alsace, Lyon, Nice, and the Basque country.  Other recipes were transportable to the flavors of Puerto Rico.  A tostón will always be at home next to a pot of mussels or that crab and grapefruit salad.  Guava sauce will be ready to top off crepes and rice pudding.  And without modification, some of those dishes surprised me for how much they just tasted like home.  That speaks volumes of the influence of French cookery in the Western world – and of the blessing of growing up around my Mother’s table.

Against most blogging conventions, I am reposting a recipe that captures the spirit of my Franco Rican table, four plus years in the making.

Sweet Plantain & Parmesan Muffins
Inspired by the Savory Cheese and Chive Bread
Yield: 12 muffins

  • 1 ripe yellow plantain (mostly black, with a few yellow spots)
  • 1 clove of garlic, grated
  • 1 cup minus 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • a few grinds of pepper
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup milk (whole or 2%)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon finely minced cilantro leaves
  1. Wrap the unpeeled plantain in foil wrap and roast in the oven at 400˚F for thirty minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool.
  2. Once the plantain is cool, rough chop into small pieces and transfer to a glass/non-reactive bowl. Add the grated garlic and combine with a spatula until well distributed.
  3. Lower the temperature of the oven to 350˚F. Butter a muffin tin and set aside.
  4. In a large bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients: flour, baking powder, salt, and pepper.
  5. Beat the egg on a separate bowl until frothy. Add the olive oil and milk and whisk again.
  6. Add to the dry ingredients the plantain mixture and the wet ingredients, and stir together until just combined. Fold in the cheese and cilantro. It’s a thick batter!
  7. Scoop the batter into the prepared muffin tin.
  8. Bake the muffins for 15-20 minutes until the tops begin to brown. Check for doneness by inserting a paring knife.  When it comes out clean, the muffins will be ready.
Thank you, Dorie.  Thank you Doristas.  All of you.  You turned one of life’s Flourishes into a Fundamental, and will remain unforgettable.

 

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Author:Adriana

Adriana is a financial analyst by day, avid home cook in the evenings, and food blogger and runner in the strange hours between those two. When not in the kitchen concocting meals and stories to pass around, she is out looking for the next great bite (or the ingredients to make it at home), checking what's new at the market, or planning a trip around great food and wine.

19 Responses to “FFwD Epilogue: Around My Franco Rican Table”

  1. June 19, 2015 at 7:08 am #

    Adriana, I hear you on the changing landscape of blogging – that (Foodbuzz!) era seems like so long ago! So wonderful to “meet” you along the way and I hope our paths will cross in real life soon! XOX

    • June 19, 2015 at 7:13 am #

      Canada is on our travel radar – the minute we plan a visit to Toronto we’ll meet for sure. It’s been wonderful cooking with you, Mardi. You are such an inspiration, between your dedication to the Petit Chefs and the great work you do at your blog. Un bisou!

  2. June 19, 2015 at 7:33 am #

    Yeah, we’ve all come a LONG way! Hoping we cross paths again soon, my friend!!! xoxo

  3. June 19, 2015 at 8:25 am #

    Beautiful post, Adriana! Meeting you was a delightful highlight of my Seattle trip! It has been a great adventure…and I’ll still be here…reading and following your posts! Happy Friday!

  4. June 19, 2015 at 8:43 am #

    How cool that you have been able to combine both French and Puerto Rican influences. It’s been quite an adventure. It’s been lovely blogging with you and I look forward to following your post-FFWD adventures.

  5. June 19, 2015 at 9:34 am #

    Oh, I love your signed book cover. What a wonderful idea.

    I have so enjoyed cooking along with you and seeing your unique, Puerto Rican twist on some of these recipes. I know the pain of not always being able to find the right ingredient, but I think it made the experience more interesting to learn about how some of these recipes could be remade with what you could find in your area. There have been many times I’ve wanted to copy one of your Puerto Rican recipes, but of course, there is no way I could find the right ingredients around here:-(

    • June 19, 2015 at 7:28 pm #

      If you are interested in any particular dish, we can brainstorm on how to make it work with the ingredients you have in Germany. A former classmate and his family spent two years in Hamburg for a work assignment. I bet they found a way to make a few recipes from home during that time. I had another friend who lived in Paris who found plantains in African and Asian markets.

  6. June 19, 2015 at 9:35 am #

    Great post here, Adriana! Love the inspiration from Dorie and the “franco-rican table” musings.

  7. June 19, 2015 at 10:24 am #

    You are so right I was never familiar with so many regions of France and Dorie brought them to life with recipes. It has been wonderful cooking along with you Adriana. Let me know when you get to NYC. I will bring you out to eat until you explode!

    • June 19, 2015 at 7:37 pm #

      Our kitchens (and all the cookbooks in our shelves) are truly a window to the world, and in this case, a country, its regions, and all those Parisian arrondissements. I’ll make sure to pack my roomiest, cutest dress to eat my way around NYC with you in the future. XO

  8. June 19, 2015 at 5:05 pm #

    What a true and right post! I have loved getting to know you through this group and while the weekly ritual is a thing of the past the accomplishment lives on in us. I adore that pic of you and Dorie! REminds me of such a great weekend!

  9. June 19, 2015 at 7:47 pm #

    Love that I can recall you in the room with Dorie when that photo was taken. Gosh we had so much fun in Seattle- no ?? It was so fabulous to meet you and all the rest of the gang (with Dorie and Michael of course !!) in that fun city. Still think that dinner we all shared at the Dahlia Lounge was one of the best meals I have had in a long time – and we all hung out like long lost cousins LOL. And of course, sharing photos of our baby cats who are like twins. Precious Gato hit the lottery when you two took him in 🙂 Priceless Facebook photo of the tissue box today – you had me cracking up during an otherwise teary eyed moment. Looking forward to keeping in touch !!!

  10. June 19, 2015 at 10:16 pm #

    Adriana, I think you’re spot on to say that the friendships formed through FFWD aren’t over, just the weekly ritual. I always enjoyed seeing how you interpreted the recipes where it was nearly impossible to find the right ingredients. Tropical French food at its best! I’m glad we had a chance to meet both in Seattle and in Boston. I will continue to follow your Puerto Rican food adventures, wherever they take you, in your kitchen, at food festivals, and at restaurants. Keep in touch!

  11. June 20, 2015 at 10:08 am #

    Adriana, your thoughts on this journey are so right on! I’ve always loved your takes on the recipes, and I will definitely have to try our your muffins! I can think of exactly what I’ll be making! I also want to thank you for your help with my Puerto Riqueno dinner I had (was it Christmas??). We enjoyed your suggestions. And I love how you remind me to get out my cookbooks and remember my lovely experience on your island!

    Your takes on the different recipes have been wonderful, and all of your musings about the different culinary events too! I’m looking forward to all of your upcoming adventures!

  12. Nana
    June 21, 2015 at 11:34 am #

    A lovely post Adriana. This certainly has been fun cooking and posting together. It
    was great to meet up with you and your husband in Seattle and I will be following all your adventures. Take care, Ro

  13. June 22, 2015 at 8:32 am #

    Our very own Miss Puerto Rico.
    I’ve enjoyed reading through these posts – and I have especially enjoyed your Puerto Rican twist on so many recipes. (P.S. My plantain skills have vastly improved over the past few months – although most of my cookbooks have been packed up in preparation for our move, the one you gave me is still sitting on the lone remaining bookshelf).
    It was a real treat to meet up with you in Seattle and if you ever plan on being in the city, let me know.
    XO

  14. June 22, 2015 at 10:38 am #

    I love your Franco Rican style Adriana! Meeting you in Seattle was a pleasure and it is my hope to see you in Puerto Rico one of these days. Take care!

  15. June 22, 2015 at 9:04 pm #

    I love this post and your adaptation of Dorie’s recipe. A perfect way to cap off the group. It’s been wonderful blogging along with you and reading about the Puerto Rican food scene in your blog. If you’re ever in Vancouver, we will have to have a Dorista meet up!

  16. September 4, 2015 at 5:47 pm #

    I rememeber foodbuz and going to San Francisco. Its been a long time since I’ve visited and I am sorry. Travels have taken over most of my time and got to the point that I just did not even want to sit with my laptop. I love this recipe and will keep it to make soon…after all its made from platanos and that my name. Saludos y abrazos a ti y tu esposo

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